Wednesday, September 15, 2010

We just finished our new Machined iPhone 4G cases. They really turned out nice.

If you are interested in buying one or just want to know a little bit more about how they are made, just go here.

Friday, August 6, 2010

Prototype iPhone 4G Cases


We are making cases for the new iPhone 4G and this is a prototype of the final version. Not only does it solve the dropped call problem, it looks cool while doing it.

Thursday, July 22, 2010


This is Bill’s 1962 Ford unibody truck. It was previously used by a local handyman who stenciled “HOME REPAIRS” on the doors with black spray paint. While removing the letters, we stepped back and it read “HOME R” as the other letters were gone. That, and the fact that the truck is yellow, is how Homer got his name. Look for more posts on this project in the future. Plans include an engine upgrade and a suspension swap.


Here is an interior shot of the cab. Notice the copper on the transmission tunnel? That is patching a hole that the PO made to install a floor shifter, presumably, after some problem with the column shift mechanism. The column shift functionality has been restored and works fine. Oh, and there are plans to replace those sweet floor mats as well.



Model A


This is our buddy Mike’s Model A truck. Right now it pretty much sits as he got it. No wiring, no working brakes, no glass, and no seats! But, it won’t stay in that condition for long. When it was purchased, it already had some work done by local rod shop Squeeg’s Kustoms. The chopped top had already been started and the body was channeled over the chassis. Additional chassis work was handled by Terry Palmer before it came to rest in the shop, where it now waits.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Merc Dash

One of our customers brought in an entire dash from a ‘49 Mercury, along with a hand drawn sketch, and asked us to design and make a custom dash for them. Of course we said, “No problem.” The main bezel is machined from a solid piece of brass, with vents on the right side to allow for A/C to flow. The gauge cluster features a red acrylic panel, that was painted, then machined, to allow for light to shine through the transparent panel in selected areas. This is only a mock-up, without the actual gauges behind the panel, but we were so pleased with how it turned out, we had to share.

Nice, huh?

This last one shows how the light behind the gauges shows through the panel.


Machined Speedster

We recently completed a short run of these machined speedsters. They end up around 7 1/2 inches long and are made from solid aluminum and feature bronze bearings in the wheels for a long life of smooth rollin'.

And, of course, made by us in the USA.